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Department of Chemical Sciences

The Department of Chemical Sciences is engaged in the study of matter and changes in matter – a science that is central to many aspects of life. Around the globe, chemists are applying the principles and skills they’ve learned to decipher troubling problems that have gone unsolved for years.

As a close-knit community of students, teachers, mentors and scholars, we pride ourselves on our small class sizes and on the individual attention our students receive.

Faculty
Cielito Tammy DeRamos King
Associate Professor and Chairperson of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 405
Tel:
508.531.2115
Email: c2king@bridgew.edu

Dr. King's current research focuses on studying the extent of contamination of soil with arsenic leaching from in-service pressure treated lumber (such as play structures, picnic tables, decks and fences). Arsenic is a major component of the pesticide chromated copper arsentate or CCa used in pressure-treated lumber to prevent rot. To determine the possible human risk of exposure to arsenic from contaminated soil, total and bioaccessible arsenic is determined from soil samples using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Another aspect of this research involves determination of risk of exposure to arsenic from direct contact with CCA-treated wood.

Degrees

BS, University of the Philippines
PhD, University of Cincinnati, Ohio

Edward Brush
Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 407
Tel:
508.531.2116
Email: ebrush@bridgew.edu

Over the past ten years Dr. Brush has mentored over thirty research students at Bridgewater State University, many of whom are currently attending graduate school or teaching high school science. His "bioorganic team" is synthesizing simple organic compounds as potential therapeutic agents. The "energy team" is investigating efficient methods to produce BSC biodiesel. Prospective high school teachers are developing green chemistry lab materials and unit plans that follow the State frameworks. Dr. Brush and his student collaborators present their work at the annual American Chemical Society conference and the Bridgewater Undergraduate Research Symposium. Bridgewater State University science students who want to learn more about these projects can contact Dr. Brush at any time.

Degrees

BS, Kings College
PhD, Pennsylvania State University

Steven Haefner
Associate Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 411
Tel:
508.531.2984
Email: shaefner@bridgew.edu


Research Interests:
Synthesis, spectroscopy and structures of transition metal coordination and organometallic complexes with particular emphasis on bi- and polymetallic systems. Applications in the areas of metal carbohydrate chemistry, catalysis, molecular recognition, metal-metal bonded assemblies, and the development of supramolecular systems.

Recent Courses:
Intermediate and Advanced Inorganic (CHEM 242, 444)
Chemical Principles I/II (CHEM 141/142)
Survey of Chemistry I/II (CHEM 131/132)
Laboratory Techniques (CHEM 492)
Undergraduate Research (CHEM 390)
Honor Research Colloquium (CHEM 135H)
Practicum Supervisor for Accelerated Post-Baculaurate

Degrees

BS, UCLA
PhD, Michigan State University

Samer Lone
Assistant Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 409
Tel:
508.531.2091
Email: samer.lone@bridgew.edu

Research Interests:
Biochemistry
Maintaining the integrity of DNA is essential for the survival of all living organisms. Cellular DNA is under constant assault by a variety of internal and external sources. For example, exposure to the sun's ultraviolet rays has the ability to cause DNA base pairs to crosslink, which potentially could lead to skin cancer. Cells have evolved a variety of mechanisms to repair resulting damaged DNA, but some of these lesions remain and increase the potential for mutagenesis. In addition to having the ability to alter the DNA's coding potential, DNA lesions present severe blocks to normal DNA replication. The recent discovery of a large group of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) polymerases, the Y-superfamily, has shed light on how cells are able to handle DNA lesions. Unlike replicative DNA polymerases, this family of DNA polymerases has the ability to traverse a variety of DNA lesions. Understanding how these DNA polymerases are able to bypass DNA lesions has obvious implications toward mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In the lab, use of a variety of molecular, biochemical, and structural techniques elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which these DNA polymerases are able to bypass specific DNA carcinogens

Recent Courses:
Biochemistry I/II (CHEM 461/462)
Advanced Biochemistry Lab (CHEM 466)
Research in Chemistry (CHEM 390)
Survey of Chemistry II (CHEM 132)

Degrees

BS, Oakland University
PhD, Wayne State University
Post Doc, Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York

Saritha Nellutla
Assistant Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center
Email: Saritha.Nellutla@bridgew.edu
Chifuru Noda
Assistant Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 421
Tel:
508.531.2998
Email: cnoda@bridgew.edu

Research Interests:
Physical Chemistry

Recent Courses:
Physical Chemistry I/II (CHEM 381/382)
Chemical Principles I/II (CHEM 141/142)
Survey of Chemistry I (CHEM 131)

Degrees

BS, MS, Kobe University, Japan
PhD, Stanford University, California

Emily Garcia Sega
Assistant Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 415
Tel:
508.531.2827
Email: emily.garciasega@bridgew.edu
Stephen Waratuke
Assistant Professor of Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 413
Tel:
508.531.2114
Email: swaratuke@bridgew.edu

Research Interests:
Dr. Waratuke is engaged in the synthesis and spectroscopic studies of titanium aryloxide, arylsulfide, carbamate, and related organic compounds and their use as catalysts for organic transformations. The development of these organometallic compounds, (existing and novel systems) for hydroamination and cross-coupling reactions of alkenes and alkynes is his current focus. The research work is driven by engaged student collaboration with the department undergraduate majors.

Recent Courses:
Organic I and II (CHEM 343, 344)
Organic I and II Labs (CHEM 343L, 344)
Survey of Chemistry I (CHEM 131)
Environmental Organometallic Chemistry (special topic, CHEM 490)
Advanced Organic, Environmental, Research Problems in Chemistry (CHEM 390)
Computers in Chemistry (CHEM 100)

Degrees

BS, University of Pittsburgh
PhD, Purdue University

Emeriti Faculty
Vahe Marganian
Professor Emeritus
Center for Science and Mathematics, Room 401
Tel:
508.531.1233
Email: vmarganian@bridgew.edu
Degrees

BS, Cal. State San Francisco
PhD, Clemson University

Staff
Jane Doherty
Staff Associate, Laboratory Manager for Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 488
Tel:
508.531.2818
Email: j2doherty@bridgew.edu
Joe Keen
Staff Assistant, Laboratory Coordinator for Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 484
Tel:
508.531.2112
Email: jkeen@bridgew.edu
Iana Mandravel-Hutchins
Staff Associate, Laboratory Instructor for Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 423
Tel:
508.531.2985
Email: ihutchins@bridgew.edu
Christina Toner
Administrative Assistant I, Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 401
Tel:
508.531.1233
Email: ctoner@bridgew.edu
Amanda Wood
Staff Assistant, Laboratory Technician for Chemical Sciences
Science and Mathematics Center, Room 486A
Tel:
508.531.2235
Email: amanda.wood@bridgew.edu
Department Chair
Dr.
Cielito Tammy DeRamos King
Tel:
508.531.2115
Administrative Assistant
Christina Toner
Tel:
508.531.1233

The department offers a BA or BS in Chemistry, a BS in Chemistry/Geology (jointly with the Department of Geological Sciences), and a Master of Arts in Teaching (Clinical Master’s/Chemistry, Chemistry or Physical Sciences). Chemistry majors may choose one of three areas of concentration: Biochemistry, Environmental Chemistry or Professional Chemistry. Undergraduate research is a central part of our programs. Unlike the faculty at many research universities, our faculty is actively engaged in direct research collaboration with our students.

Chemistry graduates are well-equipped for careers in medicine, dentistry, education, environmental sciences, chemical or pharmaceutical sales, pharmacy or veterinary medicine.

Department of Chemical Sciences
Center for Science & Mathematics
Room 401
508.531.1233